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Take a Different Road

March 31st 2006

While running, I often try to keep my runs fresh by taking different routes from time-to-time.  I don’t always know where I’ll end up when I take a different road, but I have a general idea where I’ll end up based on the direction I’m heading.
 

Many times in life we think about taking a “different road,” but we often find ourselves sticking to the same daily routine.
 

I wasn’t always comfortable taking a different road when I started running.  In fact, I was much more comfortable running the same route over and over because I knew how long it was and that I could finish it.
 

After a while, though, it became boring running the same route over and over, and I began asking myself, “What new route could I take today?”
 

I finally took a different route – a different road – and I actually enjoyed it better than my old route.  The new route challenged me more than the old route because I had to run a longer distance to complete my run.
 

Is there a different road you could take today?  Is there a different way you could do something and get a better result?
 

Is there a different way to do a season-long promotion you’ve conducted the same way the last three years?  Is there a different way to execute the annual fund-raising auction you host?  Is there a different approach you could take with your weekly staff meetings?
 

Go for it.  Why not?  Take a different road.  Do something different today.  Surprise yourself.  Venture into the unknown.  Don’t hold back.  Give it a shot!
 

Who knows what the outcome might be if you make a change or do something different, but it should be a nice change of pace for you and all those involved.  And, sometimes it’s just nice to try something new.  Who knows, you just might surprise yourself and get a better result, too.
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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Transform Challenges to Strengths

March 30th 2006

While running, I often observe homes, yards, landscaping, sheds, children’s play structures and everything outside the front, back and side of homes.  I look at the different bricks on homes, the different styles of porches…and gather ideas on how we could improve our landscape or our children’s play area in the backyard.
 

I often find myself in “observation mode” and seeking ways to learn and improve each and every time I’m at a sporting or entertainment event – alone or with my family.  It’s difficult for me to just watch and enjoy a sporting event without trying to pick up an idea or two that I can pass along to a sports organization we work with each day.
 

For those of you who work in sports, do you find yourself doing the same thing when you go to a sporting event, or some other performance?
 

It’s amazing to me when we look to improve ourselves how easy it is to find new things, discover new ways to do things, and grow and improve as a result.
 

I challenge you today to look around and find someone who does something – anything – better than you do.  When you do find that one thing you could change to positively impact your life, challenge yourself to improve and work towards making what appears to be a challenge for you today, a strength of yours in the future.
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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Why run a Marathon?

March 29th 2006

That’s a question I’m commonly asked when someone learns that running a marathon is one of the goals on my life goal list.
 

Well, I’ve paid my “race” entrance fee, have been preparing my mind and body for “the day,” and with only a few months to go, I’m finding it to be a battle of the mind, which is exactly why I have “to complete a marathon” as one of my life goals.
 

I’ve read to “stay focused on the positive,” and to add the phrase “…but it doesn’t matter” to the end of any negative thought that may creep into my mind or out of my mouth (which more times than not happens when I run more than one mile).
 

I’ve been reading “The Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer,” by Whitsett, Dolgener and Kole, which I probably should have read several months ago.  It’s been an informative read and undoubtedly will prove helpful in my training and on the day of the marathon.  Note that I didn’t say “race” day!
 

In the book, the authors share the technique of “self-talk.”  They reference how we often talk to ourselves in our heads, and how some even do this aloud.  (My wife is one of them, but don’t tell her I told you!)  Anyway, the authors share how the self-talk influences our attitudes and behaviors, and how significant this is because these thoughts lead to our perceptions of ourselves.
 

This is so true!
 

I’ve often said to people, “I’m horrible with directions.”  In fact, just this past weekend I found myself getting lost trying to find a friends home and I’m sure my self-talk wasn’t too positive!  I believe I may have talked aloud a time or two as well, and thank goodness no one else was in the car!
 

Okay, back to the marathon and “positive” self-talk!
 

For me, preparing and running in a marathon will be the ultimate challenge, especially since I’m not a “runner.”  The race is about 20 miles more than I’ve ever run at one time, and the 26.2 miles is more than I’d usually run in one week, let alone one day.
 

So why do it?  Well, that’s the same question I asked myself when it started pouring on mile three of one of my recent four-mile runs.  But I immediately followed up those negative thoughts with “because I can!”
 

So I guess that’s my answer to the question why run a marathon?
 

Because I can, and I’m thankful I can.
 

Have an awesome day and keep your “self-talk” positive!
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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Is Ice Hockey Back?

March 28th 2006

It looks like ice hockey just might be making its way back.  In places like Green Bay, Wis., where football has been king for several decades, hockey is popular with both the young and not so young, and not only as a spectator sport.
 

Youth and adult leagues, as well as male and female participation numbers, are on the rise in Wisconsin and many other states.
 

In fact, Green Bay found a way to bring together its love for football and hockey back in February when they hosted the Frozen Tundra game that featured Wisconsin and Ohio State before 40,890 fans at Lambeau Field, a game which netted an estimated $2.8 in tourism revenue.
 

Most recently, Green Bay hosted an NCAA Hockey Regional and it was a big hit with local fans and attracted thousands of out of town visitors to the area.
 

Your turn to take a shot!
 

Do you think hockey is making its way back as the fourth most popular professional sport, or has NASCAR earned that distinction?
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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Are you kidding me?

March 27th 2006

I was visiting with my daughter Kennedy (whose nickname is “KJ”) before school one day last week, and she asks her trademark question, “Guess what Dad?”  And I respond, as I usually do, “What KJ?”   “My friends at school can’t believe I really play basketball.”  I smile, thinking back to the day my wife Susie brought home the basketball registration form.  I was surprised kids could start playing organized basketball so young.  It wasn’t so long ago KJ turned six.
 

So I’m feeling all proud we started KJ at such an early age playing basketball, knowing her friends are equally impressed to learn KJ’s already a pretty good dribbler, a decent passer and a so-so shooter (sounds a lot like her Dad…the so-so shooter part).
 

Kennedy continues, “I told two of my friends I play and they said, ‘No way!’ I said, ‘Really, I do!’ They didn’t believe me.  So, one of them asks Mom, ‘Does Kennedy really play basketball?’ and of course Mom says ‘Yes.’  They just couldn’t believe it Dad!” Kennedy says laughing.
 

I respond: “Well, now they know you play.”
 

KJ continues, “Yep! They just didn’t think girls played basketball, just boys.”
 

Quite surprised, I ask “What?”  Kennedy explains, “They think only boys play basketball and girls don’t.”  I said, “Are you kidding?”  KJ says, “No, really.  They didn’t know girls could play on a team.  They thought only boys can play on a basketball team.”
 

Wow, talk about a reality check!  Quite stunned, I turn to my wife and say, “Can you believe that?  Here, I thought the girls were surprised Kennedy was playing at such a young age, but they’re surprised she’s playing because she’s a girl?  Are you kidding me?”
 

My wife, seeing that I’m getting a bit worked up says, “That’s pretty sad!”
 

“That’s beyond sad,” I respond in frustration.  “I can’t believe these young girls don’t know there’s girls basketball, and they could be playing too.  I thought after all these years, after all that has been accomplished in girls and women’s sports that we’d be much more informed, accepting and open to opportunities for girls and women’s sports.  Obviously, we still have a long way to go.”
 

As I often say, every challenge is an opportunity!
 

What are your thoughts, suggestions and ideas on how we can all do our part to better inform girls and women of the many opportunities available in sports today?
 

How can we as parents better educate and inform our kids so they grow up knowing – boys or girls – they have the opportunity to play any sport or extracurricular activity they’d like to try?
 

How can we as Dads be more open-minded, accepting and supportive of girls and women’s sports, whether we have daughters or not?
 

We have so many opportunities, and although at first frustrated to learn we still have a long way to go in educating our youth – as well as society in general – I’m excited about the many opportunities in girls and women’s sports today…to participate, to support, to promote, to sell, to encourage…to be an athlete, to be a coach, to be a teammate, to be a fan of girls and women’s sports.
 

That’s what it’s all about…providing an opportunity, which will only lead to many more opportunities.
 

Your turn to take a shot!
 

If you have a thought, idea or suggestion you’d like to share, I’d enjoy hearing from you.
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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What Kept Me Awake Last Night

March 26th 2006

I don’t know about you, but from time-to-time, I find myself working in my sleep.
 

It’s amazing to me when I plan my day’s tasks the evening before, how I can sleep, dream and work my way through some of the tasks on the list.  It’s kind of fun actually.
 

Have you ever experienced this?  It’s pretty awesome, isn’t it?
 

But every now and then, there’s something that keeps me awake and I can’t capture that sound sleep I was hopeful to enjoy when my head hit the pillow.
 

It might be that one thing I know I should have done but failed to finish the day before, or something I haven’t found an answer to, or the next great idea that has my mind awake, moving in a million directions and there’s no way I’m going to get back to sleep.
 

Well, it happened to me last night.  Unfortunately, it wasn’t a “great idea” that suddenly had me rolling out of bed at 3:06 am.  Just one of those nights when a million thoughts trampled through my brain and I started feeling guilty that I’m sleeping when there are so many other “productive” things I could be doing.
 

Ever feel that way?  I know, too many times!
 

So here I am writing the first post to The Telios Group’s blog, “What Kept Me Awake Last Night.”  How appropriate, but I must admit, it wasn’t planned.
 

In the days, weeks, and months ahead, I’ll share some of the things that keep me wake at night.  Hopefully I’ll have a thought or two that will be informative, or will make you think, react, respond, or look at something in a different way.
 

Maybe by consistently blogging I won’t have so much to say during the day.  Myy wife and kids can only hope.
 

Any way, thanks for checking in and checking out The Telios Group blog.  Until tomorrow, I hope you have an awesome day!
 

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Ron Goch, The Telios Group

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